The “Anointment” of the Brooklyn GOP Election Commisioner

Posted on February 8th, 2013

For Immediate Release

Celeste Katz’s article of February 8, 2013, in the NY Daily News Daily Politics blog, In GOP Power Play, Commissioners’ Jobs May Not Be Only Ones In Flux At NYC Board Of Elections is informative and well presented. However, it does not yet mention a few other aspects of this situation regarding the appointment of Republican Election Commissioners.

While the borough of Queens has two conflicting Republican factions, which might be what determined the circumstances surrounding the appointment of their Republican Commissioner, we have no knowledge of two openly conflicting factions in Kings County. The political power play in Queens should not have been applied to Brooklyn, and this leads to several conclusions as follows:

First and most importantly, is the failure of the respective County Chairmen of the Republican Party to submit a letter of recommendation for the appointment or reappointment of the Election Commissioners of the GOP. Such an omission created the unusual and rarely used procedure that empowered the members of the City Council of the Republican Party to fill the vacancies of Election Commissioners with what appears to be their own choice. The problem in this case is that Kings County has no Republican Council member that completely represents the borough of Brooklyn. Therefore, the choice of appointment for the Brooklyn Republican Election Commissioner had to be made by people who had nothing or very little to do with Brooklyn.

This brings the next point which is a simple question: Who authorized or made the recommendation from Kings County?

Being a “fan” of a State Senator or vice-verse should not preclude that a “fan” could be appointed to what is considered to be one of the highest positions in the Republican Party from Kings County. Similarly, this should not preclude the possibility of giving the opportunity to the Republican Executive Committee of Kings County (especially duly elected ones, and not the appointed ones) to recommend other Republican Party members for appointment to this position, especially those who have previous experience and knowledge of the NYC Board of Elections and its procedures. Perhaps the appointment of “fans” is one of the reasons why the NYC Board of Elections has been defined as “dysfunctional”.  As such, it will continue to have this reputation if recommendations for appointments to all Board of Election jobs are based upon loyalty to the party alone and not on consideration to qualifications for a particular position.

Lucretia Regina-Potter

Republican State Committeewoman-49th AD

This entry was posted on Friday, February 8th, 2013 and is filed under Commentary. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed.